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A idea for video on Motherboards

Ive always wondered what performance increase if any Motherboards bring to the table? Some of them are seriously expencive and their reviews all harp on about this and that. But do they actually bring much performance to the table over other similar boards at cheaper prices.

Comments

  • The only thing better motherboard would gets you is less voltage drop when your CPU go under full load and better ram overclock. There able to get the last 1% out of the CPU. As long as you get a half decent motherboard it should be Okay. They better if you do extreme overclock with LN2 or Phase Change Cooling.
    Motherboard : ASRock Z77 Extreme 4 (8 + 4 Power Phase Design)
    CPU: Intel i5-3570k at 4.7GHz  1.32v
    CPU Cooler: DEEPCOOL Gamer Storm CAPTAIN 240
    Ram: V-Color OC Series 16GB (4x4GB) 2133Mhz 10-11-11-30-1T at 1.550v
    Storage:  ADATA Premier SP550 2.5" 480GB and 2Tb 3.5" Seagate
    Graphic Card: GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 960 4GB G1 GAMING OC EDITION
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 550 GS
    Mouse: MSI Interceptor
    Keyboard: Corsair K70 Vengeance Mechanical Gaming Keyboard, Cherry MX Red
    Monitors : 3x AOC 22" 1080p, 1x Dell 1080p Monitor

  • but i dont think most people know this, or have seen this.

    I for one am wondering why I spent the wasted money on this hero IV when I could of got a cheaper board that does exactly the same thing for a 1800x. IE doesnt like ram, doesnt like overclocking past 4Ghz.

    But I am sure there are more expamples
  • Hey, some motherboards also have features that some people just want to have ;). For example the AI-Suite etc.
    I also made the experience that higher end motherboards undervolt their CPUs a bit better.
  • FunPosterFunPoster Posts: 22
    Steve from Gamers Nexus (alongside der8auer, buildzoid, etc.) has been pretty vocal about his distaste for several motherboards with inadequate VRM solutions/heatsinks, especially relating to Intel HEDT platforms (look up the EVGA Dark boards compared to the competition) and the Ryzen platform. A great example is on many Ryzen B350 boards, which technically support overclocking, but do not have the necessary VRMs or VRM cooling to support the voltage needed for high-end overclocks on 8-core, or even 6-core parts. Your CPU cooling could be totally overkill, but it won't mean a thing if your VRMs are thermal throttling the CPU.

    Apart from that, many of the features are IO related. You're potentially receiving more rear USB3.1 ports, more SATA3 ports and m.2 slots on your motherboard, and even things like SLI/Crossfire support which are restricted from lower-end boards even within the Z370 range, for example. Q-code readouts are limited to high-end motherboards, which are a huge help when troubleshooting, since you're being told exactly what is wrong. Hell, even RGB lighting is a big feature that drives up the cost of higher-end boards which is limited from the lower-end stuff.

    I'll compare the Ryzen launch period, since that's the last time I purchased a motherboard. I got the Crosshair VI Hero, which has FAR more extensive rear IO than the next board down at the time, the Prime X370 Pro, and also has an actual heatpipe-based VRM solution, rather than the big blocks which are thrown on top of VRMs nowadays which seem to do very little to dissipate heat. The C6H also officially supports 3200MHz+ on memory overclocks, which the Prime Pro doesn't, and arguably has the best memory compatibility of all the available X370 boards available. It also had several quality-of-life improvements not available on other boards. The BIOS flashback/recovery/upgrade utility that ASUS have, that doesn't require the PC to be turned on, saved my board from being bricked in the early days when everything was a total mess.

    Boards at a similar (but slightly cheaper) price point also had their issues, or things I was wary about. From what I remember, the Gigabyte K7 and K5 boards were said to have some memory issues, and did not have as fully featured rear IO. The same could be said for the Taichi's rear IO, and I always wanted to stay away from it, because AsRock in my experience save money by manufacturing flimsy, but fully featured, boards.

    I think that sort of covers it. If you intend to go for high end overclocking on the CPU or memory, simply like tinkering with your PC, or value having a lot of connectivity, a high-end motherboard is worth the investment.
    Thanked by 1NellyNelson
    CPU - R7 1700 @ 3.9GHz | Motherboard- Asus Crosshair VI Hero | RAM - G.Skill Trident Z 16GB 3200MHz | GPU - Asus GTX 1080 Strix | Case - Fractal Define R5 | Boot Drive - Samsung 500GB 850 Evo | Storage - Mushkin Reaktor 1TB, HGST Deskstar 4TB, Seagate Barracuda 1TB  | PSU - Seasonic x-750 750W | Display - Asus PB258Q 25" 1440p |  Cooling - Noctua NH-D15

  • NellyNelsonNellyNelson Posts: 216
    i got the vi hero as well and this thing wont overclock at all without hassle. I even RMA it  and they all said it was great. But Ive got a Krait x99 next to it and its not missed a beat with a xeon in it.

    So what was I spending that extra cash for. I dont need the AIO ports in the back

  • FunPosterFunPoster Posts: 22
    Whatever issues I've had with the C6H have been far more related to Ryzen as a platform than problems with the board. X99 is a far more mature platform, which actually had major issues upon launch that people seemingly choose not to remember.
    CPU - R7 1700 @ 3.9GHz | Motherboard- Asus Crosshair VI Hero | RAM - G.Skill Trident Z 16GB 3200MHz | GPU - Asus GTX 1080 Strix | Case - Fractal Define R5 | Boot Drive - Samsung 500GB 850 Evo | Storage - Mushkin Reaktor 1TB, HGST Deskstar 4TB, Seagate Barracuda 1TB  | PSU - Seasonic x-750 750W | Display - Asus PB258Q 25" 1440p |  Cooling - Noctua NH-D15

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